Using Linux for Photography, Can we make it better?

Following my post “Using Linux for Photography, where we stand“, Svetoslav Trochev sent me an email inquiring about Photography oriented Linux distribution. Months later, I received another email from Svetoslav: he hadn’t abandoned the project but rather had given it lots of thoughts and wanted to share his  reflexion with the community. It is my pleasure to have him as the first external contributor to Linux & Photography blog. Thanks a lot!

About me.

As a kid, I won a small price, an USSR made camera. Very quickly I become obsess with it. As result, it became a problem. I was bended from all parties because unwillingly produced too much “black mail” quality photos and second my parents and I could not afford the expensive hobby. I was forced to give-up on photography. At the same time I become fully occupied with the computers and later it turn into my profession. Several years ago I bought my self a new shiny digital camera and the old charcoals re-ignited again. I am Windows System Administrator at work, but at home I would run Linux only. Except I am struggling setting-up good workflow for my photography under Linux. That is how I found Joel’s blog.

What is the solution?

After I finished reading Joel’s post my immediate reaction as other that have commented his post was that we need new Linux distribution, design from the ground up for all of us Linux photographers, armatures and professionals. Not only that I in fact started to research and create plan for that kind of distribution. Very soon I hit the wall and now I think this is wrong approach to the problem.

  1. Creating a new distribution has big overhead that will slow down the project.
  2. The new distribution will have limited set of tools that will provide single workflow and making this workflow fitting the needs for every one will become impossible task. I thing that is why we have so many independent projects that re-discover the wheel over and over again. And the main problem is that many of moved to Linux because we like to customize our systems to fit our needs not other way around.
  3. Linux distribution designed for Photography has place only on dedicated workstation in professional studio, but most of as will need our system for general tasks like surfing the Internet, e-mail and etc.

So the big question do we accept the current situation and wait for independent projects to mature on the own or we can take charge and help the process?

What I would like to see?

I think what we need is new approach to our problems. After reading all the comments I realized that there is huge untapped pool of knowledge between us. So I think the first step should be everyone of us to make effort to document their workflow. This should produce lists of tools that can handle each step of the image processing. Next, if we can establish contacts between leaders of those projects allowing them to work together on building a common frame work. For example how many databases we need to store tags? I would say one that provides core functionality and expandability for new features. If we are successful with that very soon all tools will improve rapidly because each project could spend more time on their custom features. At the same time interoperability between tools will make quantum leap. Even better if we have stable frame work will allow to be included in different desktop environments and even the kernel it self.

Can we do this?

I think we can. So I have an idea for project something like wiki pages where everyone can document their workflow. Share ideas between us how to overcome common problems. At the same site we can maintain list of common and unsolved problems that will work as reference for other projects. We can have something like live FAQ and HOWTO pages. I would like to know if there is interest in that kind of project or might be already exist!

Thank you,

Svetoslav Trochev

47 Responses to Using Linux for Photography, Can we make it better?

  1. smokey breeze says:

    I am just getting back into photography after a long hiatus from shooting slow chrome slide film in my SLR – my high school graduation gift (decades ago).

    I have spent lots of time trying to pull together a Linux based solution for digital photography.

  2. Hub says:

    Seriously, a dedicated distro is a waste of time. What is needed is better tools/software.

  3. Ced says:

    I agree we don’t need a new distribution. All we need is the right tools and a documented workflow. A meta package would do us a lot of good here. Finding the right tool(s) for the job is solving half the problem already.

    Sharing our workflow process is equally important. We definitely need to document our flow: it will help us find out what we’re missing and come up with recommendations for developers to improve their applications to better interact with each other, enhancing our work flow as a result.

  4. John says:

    I am interested in the idea of Linux photography having a higher profile. I’m not exactly clear on what “recording/sharing workflow” means or how it is to be used.

    I would like to see better tools and more information about how to use them on a wiki. What I know now (not much) I’ve picked up through trial and error, Youtube and sites such as this.

    Some distros have their own download site and you can recommend and rate the software. This is the case with Linux Mint, my current distro. I will be recommending Geeqie (thank you to this site for my finding it) to them and see if it can get listed.

    I’m not sure what else can be done, but sure would like to see a good wiki developed around the Linux photography tools.

    My $0.02 worth.

    John

  5. Jaims says:

    I also agree that -IMHO- is more about tools that about a new distro. And also agree that documenting the workflow/tools would be an important step; at least it would reflect what our needs are and where the strengths/weaknesses of the existing tools lie.

    Then, we’d know which software should be written (difficult) and which software should be improved (sort of more feasible).

    To start with, I can PP the pictures I take from GNU/Linux; which involves the use of proprietary software (Canon DPP) through wine (which in some cases can be solved with RawTherapee, proprietary as well, and it really depends on the picture). I can’t rely on UFraw by now, as I haven’t been able to solve the color profiles thing so far.
    For the rest of it, The Gimp + plugins (mainly GreyCStoration) do a nice work (I also use a bit NoiseNinja, though, which is proprietary).

    As John has said, my 2 cents worth.

    Cheers

  6. cmot says:

    While I can’t comment a lot on the photography side, I can recommend Debian (yes, my favorite distribution, so I’m a bit biased😉 as a good basis for projects like this. After the ideas phase has well started, it should be easy to create a Debian photography subproject within the “Debian Pure Blends” (http://cdd.alioth.debian.org/blends/; formerly “Debian Custom Distributions”) framework. I’m sure there are quite a few Debian Developers interested in photography.

  7. Tobias says:

    We don’t need just an other distribution, that’s right. What we need are good tools. And therefore we need developers. Not only developers but developers, who talk to each other and to the users.

    So, all what you wrote is true, but not very new. There is already the create project[1]. From the website:

    “We catalyze communication and sharing between Free and Open Source creative software communities like Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, Open Clip Art Library, Open Font Library and more. We do Libre Graphics Meeting and share Specifications. Join our Mailing List, use the Wiki, or chat…”

    Please don’t invent the wheel again. Use the create wiki, spend money for the next Libre Graphics Meeting [2] and/or go to the Libre Graphics Meeting to talk with the developers. Fix the tools, learn programming.

    [1] http://create.freedesktop.org/
    [2] http://www.pledgie.com/campaigns/2926

  8. Tobias says:

    @cmot
    Everyone here agreed that creating a new distribution is not a good idea. You should at least give us some good reasons for yaold (yet an other linux distri).

  9. WIl says:

    As much less of an a photographer than likely most here, I generally do not even worry about raw. My tagging system is just my file system. 2009 -> kids -> kid name or event name

    I have never liked tags in that you must remember the old ones you used. I would like the ability to lock down the tags, or just click on the tags in a tag cloud to add to the photo. Then only if I want a new tag, create a new one.

    So my 2 points for a tagging system are:

    Import from folders (Each parent folder name is a tag)
    Lockable database

    Agreed on no more distros.

  10. gregoriosz says:

    I think there are a lot of good apps under linux for photograpy, but it is quite difficult to organise the workflow well.
    I use digikam to organise and archive my pictures, rawtherapee to develpo raw files and gimp for bigger manipulations.

  11. rico says:

    I agree, no more distros! Just pick the flavour you like, and add the tools.
    there are a lot of good tools out there, but the lack of colour profiling can make them useless in many cases.
    I use picasa3 to organise/select the pictures as it is very fast to render large amounts of raw files, so it speeds up the process to go through all the pics in a >2gb CF card. I tried to do this process (selection) first in rawtherapee but it takes ages to load all the pictures. I then use rawtherapee for devolopping the raws, and finally post processing in gimp.

  12. Mark says:

    I’s say that some sort of software ‘suite’ for photography would be nice. A bit like an office suite, but for photography with all the interoperability that would come with it. With some dedicated tools that would greatly improve workflow.

  13. John says:

    I use Linux for processing and printing my pictures. But I didn’t find a good and free raw-converter with a good integrated workflow. So I use Bibble (there is a native Linux version) for my raw images. The new version (B5) looks very promising, beyond all other converters that run on Windows and Mac only.
    For printing I use the TurboPrint drivers.
    The only weak point under Linux is color management and monitor/printer profiling. Sure it would be nice to have *free* software on Linux that beats the commercial packages.

  14. Erland says:

    Yep, much has been said already but a new distro is definitely not the way to go and I agree that current tools need to overcome several hurdles. I’d be interested in contributing to the project described in this post – documenting work-flow, helping to outline where holes need filling, testing, etc.

    At the most basic level, I don’t use RAW at all (though I’m a professional photographer), I use Digikam extensively for organisation & data-basing (and wish it’s built-in editing was better), GIMP for editing (curves, colours, retouching), F-Spot for exporting to Flickr, XSane for scanning film photos and Scribus when I need to use the photo in a CMYK printing-press ready PDF.

  15. Tobias says:

    As I wrote in an earlier post (Blocked as spam?), there is already an project like the one Svetoslav proposed. Have a look at create.freedesktop.org:

    “We catalyze communication and sharing between Free and Open Source creative software communities like Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, Open Clip Art library, Open Font Library and more. We do Libre Graphics Meeting and share Specifications. Join our Mailing List, use the Wiki, or chat at #create on irc.freenode.net.”

    If you want to write down your workflows, why not use the wiki there? And if you are interested in helping the developers even more please support the Libre Graphics Meeting and donate some money. Perhaps even going to the Libre Graphics Meeting and talk to the developers is an good idea.

  16. Trancept says:

    I also think there is no need of a new distro.

    A wiki will be a nice !
    But it’s difficult to keep a “digest” document if everyone document their own workflow : there will be too much. But we can first identify different type of workflow and then participate to improve these workflow.
    For example I use a script that I write to :
    – copy file from the CF to hard drive with removing sub-directory
    – rotate images according to Exif data
    – rename it with date an a text that the script ask to the user.

    Many other people probably do the same thing but with little difference… Do we all publish our script on a different page or do we modify the same page to achieve a perfect one ? Maybe both solution ?

    PS : Sorry to say that I’ve planned to buy BibblePro 5 to increase my productivity… And also because I can’t achieve good noise reduction whith UFRaw + Gimp + GREYCStoration : It could probably do as good as Noise Ninja (embeded in Bibble) but it is too difficult to configure for me.

  17. Rodbotic says:

    a wiki does sound interesting there is a lot of programs and info that I randomly come across that would be nice to have in one spot.

    most of my workflow is before camera, so I don’t need to touch-up my photos much.
    unless I am doing a custom compo, or a wildlife shot.

    all my photos are organized by subfolders
    /photos/2009/march/event/
    thats for the untouched
    and the touched photos
    /photos/2009/march/event/fix/??????whatIdid.jpg

  18. Scott says:

    IMHO, we already have some very good Linux photography tools. However, getting them configured and learning how to use them with an effective workflow can be challenging. A central place documenting how to configure the available Linux photography tools, including workflow examples, would be extremely beneficial. I don’t think a photography specific distribution would accomplish much other than possibly encouraging a central location for much needed documentation. Here’s a list of the most critical items, IMHO, needed to improve photography in Linux:

    1. Central location for documention dealing with tool configuration, integration, and workflow, including color calibration and management.

    2. Improved color calibration and management tools

    3. 16-bit color support in GIMP (It’s coming, hurray!)

    4. Adjustment layers in GIMP

    5. Support to retain png exif data in GIMP

    I shoot 100% RAW and use Linux to process all of my DSLR photos. I use GQview for viewing and culling the RAW files, and Digikam for organizing, and occasionally, editing. UFRaw, GIMP, and Imagemagick are my processing workhorses. Exiftool is useful for restoring the exif data stripped by GIMP. I can choose to individually or batch process at the RAW level and/or individually or batch process at the final resizing and conversion to jpeg:

    Workflow ( )=optional depending on needs:

    UFRaw –> 16-bit png –> (Digikam) –> 16-bit png –> (GIMP) 8-bit png –> Imagemagick –> 8-bit jpeg

    I try not to use the GIMP, unless needed, so I can keep a 16-bit workflow until the final output from Imagemagick. In fact, most of my photos are processed with a simple UFRaw –> 16-bit png –> Imagemagick –> 8-bit jpeg workflow with the ability to batch process at either step.

    Well, sorry this got kind of long…hopefully, it was helpful to someone. Photos using this methodology are available for viewing at http://sjmpix.zenfolio.com .

  19. Tobias says:

    I now write this a third time. (Spam filter?)
    Please have a look at the Create project at
    create . freedesktop . org

    From the homepage:
    “We catalyze communication and sharing between Free and Open Source creative software communities like Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, Open Clip Art library, Open Font Library and more. We do Libre Graphics Meeting and share Specifications. Join our Mailing List, use the Wiki, or chat”

    And if you are interested in sponsoring the developers please donate for the next Libre Graphics Meeting.

  20. Scott says:

    IMHO, we already have some very good Linux photography tools. However, getting them configured and learning how to use them with an effective workflow can be challenging. A central place documenting how to configure the available Linux photography tools, including workflow examples, would be extremely beneficial. I don’t think a photography specific distribution would accomplish much, other than possibly encouraging a central location for much needed documentation. Here’s a list of the most critical items, IMHO, needed to improve photography in Linux:

    1. Central location for documention dealing with tool configuration, integration, and workflow, including color calibration and management.

    2. Improved color calibration and management tools

    3. 16-bit color support in GIMP (It’s coming, hurray!)

    4. Adjustment layers in GIMP

    5. Support to retain png exif data in GIMP

    I shoot 100% RAW and use Linux to process all of my DSLR photos. I use GQview for viewing and culling the RAW files, and Digikam for organizing, and occasionally, editing. UFRaw, GIMP, and Imagemagick are my processing workhorses. Exiftool is useful for restoring the exif data stripped by GIMP. I can choose to individually or batch process at the RAW level and/or individually or batch process at the final resizing and conversion to jpeg:

    Workflow ( )=optional depending on needs:

    UFRaw –> 16-bit png –> (Digikam) –> 16-bit png –> (GIMP) 8-bit png –> Imagemagick –> 8-bit jpeg

    I try not to use the GIMP, unless needed, so I can keep a 16-bit workflow until the final output from Imagemagick. In fact, most of my photos are processed with a simple UFRaw –> 16-bit png –> Imagemagick –> 8-bit jpeg workflow with the ability to batch process at either step.

    Well, sorry this got kind of long…hopefully, it was helpful.

  21. Davros says:

    Someone mentioned a meta package. This sounds like a good idea. Pick a distro for it to focus on like Ubunutu Studio and we might be able to achieve some good things without going nuts and doing our own distrubution.

    Mepis installs with very helpful documentation and places it in an obvious and easy to access spot. Perhaps our metapackage could do something similar. This documentation could cover the basics and explain what is available,etc, in addition to providing hyperlinks to wikis and other websites we set-up.

    And although I would like to see 100% free photo tools for Linux, 90% free is better than 0%, or 89% for that matter. We should consider mentioning Lightzone and Bibble, Photogenics, etc as some will not be able to get along without them, at least until for a while. Perhaps even include reviews of these products on our websites. (We could even use these reviews to mention they are propritary and the advantages of open source programmes.)

    Another suggestion I would like to make would be to organize a collective wish list for improvements to existing tools. Then we could go through and it give cooridinated feedback to the seperate developers. For the ones who do not care about photography workflow and focus their apps on other things this may not be helpful for us.🙂 However, some of these applications obviously are directed towards photographic use and they may appreciate feedback that takes into account everything, not just their one app.

  22. Davros says:

    I almost forgot: The Open Source Photography website should be checked out. http://osp.wikidot.com/start

  23. John says:

    @Davros. I like the idea of a collective wishlist and then getting back to the developers.

    Also, I think many of the forums have opportunities to have a specialist photography section (I’m thinking of all the Other Communities section on the Ubuntu site – there is an Art & Design forum there). However, a dedicated Linux Photography forum would be best, as I’m sure many photographers would not like to be confined to using just Ubuntu. Perhaps the OSP site mentioned by Davros is a good starting place?

    This is a good discussion and some great ideas coming forward. I really hope something comes of it.

    Best regards
    John

  24. Ced says:

    Yes, the Open Source Photography seems like the best place to put our efforts on.

    They already have a wiki set up (http://wiki.osphoto.org) and some interesting content to work with.

    They discuss the workflow on this page: http://wiki.osphoto.org/index.php/The_big_picture (notably missing ‘color management’ – that’s something we can help with).

    On a side note, I maintain a modest page about digital photography with Linux on a popular photography forum: http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=526570. Some useful content that can be picked up for the wiki (no workflow information there though).

  25. Svetoslav Trochev says:

    I would like to thank everyone for sharing your own ideas and comments. Special thanks to Joel for facilitating the discussion. I was quietly watching the comments and I am quite excited that other people have very similar ideas. I think we can organize very interesting project. As preparation steps I will try, over the weekend, to summarize all ideas generated so far. I would like to encourage everyone to think about the following three questions:
    1. What would be our long and short term goals?
    2. How the new project would be governed?
    3. What kind of resources we can use in order to achieve the projects’ goals?

    Please post you ideas here as comment to the current thread or you can e-mail me directly at sal_electronics (at) hotmail (dot) com.

    Thank you very much.

    PS. We need cool and expiring name for the project!🙂

  26. Ced says:

    Svetoslav,

    Consider teaming up with Open Source Photography, they have similar goals and have a working infrastructure (a dedicated wiki & they are using a flickr group as forum).

    It’s easier than starting from scratch.

  27. Glen says:

    Joel and Svetoslav,

    Thanks for providing a forum and post. I have been reading your blog since late summer last year.

    I had used a film SLR on and off for thirty years but finally upgraded to digital in 2002 and a Nikon DSLR in 2006. I’m currently shooting mostly digital with some film. I shoot almost all RAW.

    I’ve been using Linux at home since 1997 so it was only natural that I continued using Linux for digital photography. I am generally very impressed with the quality of the digital photography tools already available for Linux. I don’t think we need a distribution specifically for this task. I am currently using Ubuntu 8.04 after using Slackware and a couple other distros.

    Here’s list of the software/workflow I’m currently using:

    Color management – ArgyllCMS with dispcalGUI frontend and DTP-94 colorimeter
    Import and organize – gThumb – I don’t do complex tagging. I generally have it sorted by camera/date only.
    RAW manipulation – Bibble Pro – I’ve been impressed with Bibble Pro. I do sometimes use Cinepaint or GIMP with Ufraw.
    Panos – Hugin.
    HDR – Qtpsfgui and Cinepaint
    Basic Image Manipulation – Cinepaint or GIMP. I don’t tend to do very complex manipulation.

    I have been VERY SLOWLY writing an application which uses exiftool to take the image data taken from a Nikon F100 and adds the image taking data to the jpegs scanned when the film is developed.

    I don’t tend to do much printing or scanning at home, but I’ve been using HPLIP and Xsane.

    Thanks for the link to the Open Source Photography web site, and thanks for your blog. I have found answers for more than one of my how-to questions here on your blog.

  28. Daniel says:

    I shoot mainly family photos and available-light candids. I shoot in RAW, but after developing to jpg, I archive the RAWs onto dvd.

    Here’s my workflow:
    – Nautilus to copy off the memory card
    – Immediate backup to network
    – gthumb to select photos. Bound hotkeys to move photos into folders. (Rawstudio does this kind of thing but the conversion controls just aren’t powerful enough yet)
    – ufraw to develop all selected photos, then ufraw-batch *.ufraw to actually create the jpegs
    – f-spot for organizing and tagging.
    – Copy all raws I haven’t deleted onto a dvd, even the ones I didn’t develop.

    Works well, but the workflow is disjointed among so many tools, since it seems each tool has only one thing it’s good at.

  29. b1gmoose says:

    I’m looking forward to setting up some digital editing software for my Wife. I just purchased her a new Nikon D60 with a kit lens. I also ordered a couple GIMP books (she likes books more than web-pages). The camera, warranty, bag, books, etc ate up quite a chunk of her budget. So I’ve been looking at Linux to get her going with her digital editing. Thanks to the blog and the comments above, I think I’ve found what we need to get started. I’ll keep you posted.

  30. dave says:

    Bibble4 would be great if it were stable. Of course, there’s Bibble5 coming out soon – right after Duke Nukem forever.

    Once you’ve processed your images with Bibble perhaps you’d like to wrestle with Gimp. But perhaps not.

    Windows still has the edge for digital photo processing/editing, I feel.

  31. Damon Lynch says:

    I download, rename and backup images using an application I’ve authored, Rapid Photo Downloader – http://damonlynch.net/rapid/

    I process RAW images in Bibble. I often work with hundreds of images at a time, and I find Bibble is essential to remaining productive. I do my post processing in Photoshop, because it has features that the Gimp lacks, e.g. sharpening in the LAB color space. I wish it were not so, but I don’t anticipate that changing any time soon.

    I use a variety of scripts I’ve written to manage my RAW archives and finished JPGs.

  32. NewMikey says:

    Has anybody even looked at the DPE?

    From its website:

    Except for a few tiny changes this is a regular PCLinuxOS, be it with a convenient twist. The changes concern the following details:

    1. Pre-installed packages for everything concerning the managing and editing of digital images. These are in almost all cases standard PCLOS packages out of the official repositories. In only one case, a package has been upgraded to a newer version and the upgraded packages have been provided upstream to the PCLOS development team.
    2. An incredible amount of plug-ins and scripts for the image editing program The GIMP. From redeye correction to adaptive contrast and from noise reduction with the newest algorithms (GreyCstoration)to the so-called “Highpass” sharpening filter, it’s all there, pre-installed and ready to go. Even “David’s Batch Processor” or DBP has been pre-installed.
    3. A directory filled to bursting with ICC color profiles for almost all camera-, printer- and monitortypes and the gorgeous curvesets of Fotogenetic are at your disposal.
    4. By special permission from Gabor Horvath, the author of RawTherapee (http://www.rawtherapee.com/), we have been allowed to include this great program. Although RawTherapee has a closed license, it is free and Gabor’s permission allows us to distribute it on this liveCD.
    5. As a treat, we have also included the Kommander script UFRaw-Assist. This works as a batch converter for camera raw files. You drag raw files onto the desktop droptarget (upto 255 files) and all files are converted, denoised and sharpened. If you wish, thumbnails are simultaneously generated.

  33. Harland says:

    Sounds like a great idea.
    Not a new distribution, but a wiki (as a start) to publish the Linux User side of Amateur to Pro photography workflow. The open source photography wiki (http://wiki.osphoto.org/) looks like a good beginning, but i don’t think it will cover Linux photography as its focus is (seems) strictly OSS. And there has been many mentions of Non-OSS tools that people need (/like) in order to get the work done.
    I suggest (repeat in kind) a LinuxPhotography.org/wiki or similiar, and first up is the general workflow with links to all the more specific ideas (Pro track, amateur track, etc) and tools you can do the job with, successfully. (Remember this is more in the User domain, thinking of my wife.) Inkscape diagrams here would be great.

    Basically, I want it to answer the question. “I have a digital camera, how do I use linux to transfer, organize, edit/process, and publish, all the while display, my digital images”. And each with there caveats: easily, effectively, correctly.

    I hope this gets off the ground, because I know my wife would relish a one stop shop to make her occupation that much easier (and me as I had gently coaxed her on to linux).

  34. linux photog says:

    so overall, which specific programs is most recommended in working with raw to 16 bit tiff files?

    raw therapee vs ufraw (raw edits)
    cinepaint or digikam? (is digikam comparable with both cinepaint and gimp, eg. working in 16 bit levels or curves)

    other software alternatives?

    also are there other platforms besides puppy linux that support multisession disc?

    what is the correct process in downloading cinepaint? as there are several download links when you click on the cinepaint download from sourceforge.

    http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=75029&package_id=76680&release_id=515394

    .diff, .gz, .rpm, .dmg , are the different file types.

    or as alternative, how do you download and install grafpup on the repository site at

    http://www.puppylinux.ca/tpp/Grafpup/

  35. bob D says:

    @linux photog

    Personally I would switch to a different distro.
    One that has a larger software repository like Debian or one of its’ derivatives, say Ubuntu or Kubuntu. This way you can install all the software discussed on this site through the package manager.

  36. Jac says:

    Mostly I just want to say thanks. This page has a lot of resources listed that I plan on delving into in the future.The OSP wiki looks very promising.
    My simple workflow consists of downloading pictures into fspot, into ufraw, then gimp (very glad that gimp is going to 16 bit), and finally onto my desktop for I like to ‘sit’ on a full frame image before judging whether or not it worth sharing. And that leads me to Flickr. I share my photos on Flickr for feedback and critiques.
    I agree with so many others that another separate distro is not needed. But I can see where a specialised distro like edubuntu (edubuntu is designed for education with school kids [maybe a photobuntu?]) might be useful.
    Whatever comes out of these ideas from everyone, I would hope that there it is community driven. As Linux is supported by a community, so should a new system designed just for photogs should be, imho.

  37. Jac says:

    Hmm, it would appear that the OSP wiki is over run by spammers. Hope this is just temporary?

  38. Carl says:

    I, like many others it seems, would like to see how others are using existing tools in their photography work flow. I think that there are some excellent tools available, but no framework for building a cohesive work flow exists. IMHO, the GNU/Linux photographer community’s ultimate goal should be the support of development of a framework into which existing tools can be plugged, thus allowing for maximum flexibility. This would not necessarily preclude use of non OSS tools. I look forward to hearing thoughts on the OSP wiki.

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    can I say… I hesitate a lot and don’t manage to get anything done.

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